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Bridge Gallery Exhibits 2011

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Curator's Choice, selections from the UH museum consortium

(09/06/11 - 12/16/11)


The University of Hawai'i Museum Consortium [UHMC] consists of units in the UH system which house living and non-living collections or are engaged in exhibition programs. Formed in 2008, the UHMC was created to promote the significance of the collections by showcasing them in exhibits, advocating for their needs, and consolidating resources.

The Collections are valuable resources for the University. They provide opportunities for people to learn about the extraordinary variety of objects created by different societies and how they are made, used, and valued. Viewing and sometimes handling collections allow students and visitors to appreciate both the object itself (material composition, design, size) and its cultural significance (function, meaning, value).

Research done by curators on the cultural, economic, historical, political, religious, and regional importance of an object, and by collections managers on the material composition and care of objects is crucial to the development of cultural knowledge and the preservation of the object for future generations. Natural history collections provide enormous economic and scientific benefits to society and are irreplaceable resources that must be preserved for future generations.

The UH Virtual Museum [UHVM] enables students, educators, researchers, and the public to explore a variety of University of Hawai'i collections through a single, web-accessible portal. It reduces the cost and redundancy of publicizing electronic information individually, while integrating online presentations. Through the UHVM, the UH Museum Consortium hopes to improve public understanding and recognition of UH collections. The UHVM utilizes the internet to bring Hawai'i's diverse heritage collections to a global audience. Greater accessibility to the collections will provide new research opportunities for users and lead to the sharing of ideas across disciplines, campuses, and geographic regions.

The UHMC is currently led by Dr. Karen K. Kosasa, Director of the Museum Studies Graduate Certificate Program and Associate Professor in American Studies, and Michael B. Thomas, Collections Manager of the Joseph F. Rock Herbarium. For a listing of members of the UHMC, visit: http://www.museum.hawaii.edu.

For more information, please contact Teri Skillman, Events & Communications Coordinator, (skillman@hawaii.edu) or call 956-8688 on weekdays.

Curator's Choice



Contemporary PIKO AND HOEA Artists' Works

(06/06/11 - 8/28/11)


Honolulu, HI ~ The UH Manoa Library premiers contemporary works from artists of the 2007 PIKO Gathering and the HOEA Native Hawaiian Art Project in Hamilton Library's Bridge Gallery from June 6 - August 28, 2011. Curated by artist Harinani Orme, the exhibit features diverse mediums of 170 works by 73 PIKO and HOEA artists that include kumu, haumana, KHF board and steering committee members.

In 2007 the PIKO Gathering of 115 Indigenous Visual Artists (23 First Nations, 38 Maori, 6 Pacific Islanders, and 48 Native Hawaiians) was held in Waimea on Hawai'i Island. The PIKO Gathering consisted of three days of cultural exchanges, five days and nights of art making by PIKO artists that produced 136 pieces of art in drawing, painting, printmaking, jewelry, glass, ceramics, wood, stone, fiber, and video.

It was this gathering that sparked the launching of HOEA, Hawaiian 'Ohana for Education in the Arts, an innovative three-year pilot project for Native Hawaiian art education sponsored by the Keomailani Hanapi Foundation (KHF), and funded through grants from the Administration for Native Americans (ANA), Office of Hawaiian Affairs (OHA), the Richard Smart Foundation and Hawaii Tourism Authority.

The HOEA Studio Program is a post-secondary level art school for emerging and professional artists that aims to develop participants' art skills to higher levels by working closely with Hawaiian and indigenous master artists. This unique approach to arts education is inclusive and intergenerational with a focus on contributing services to artists in the Hawaiian community. HOEA's master kumu are dedicated to teaching from the wellspring of Hawaiian culture and tradition, as well as contemporary art forms by creating deep and lasting opportunities for all. HOEA also has a public showcase for artists, called the PIKO Gallery, which opened in 2010 in Waimea, Hawai'i Island.

HOEA also sponsors the HOEA Market, which provides an opportunity for Kanaka Maoli artists to showcase and sell their art. The organization's goal is to build a Community Art Center in the target community of Waimea, South Kohala, Hawai'i Island and establish a post-secondary School of Hawaiian Fine Arts.

For more information, please contact Teri Skillman, Events & Communications Coordinator, (skillman@hawaii.edu) or call 956-8688 on weekdays.

Contemporary PIKO AND HOEA Artists' Works




Peace Corps

(01/10/11 - 05/15/11)


The University of Hawaii at Manoa and Hilo played vital roles in early Peace Corps volunteer training in the 1960s. Many returning volunteers reside in Hawaii and contribute to the islands in any ways. The exhibit includes historical film footage of President Kennedy and Sargent Shriver, archived photos including the Hilo Training Center, the Waipio Valley training village, personal photos and journals, Peace Corps memorabilia and artifacts provided by local Returned Peace Corps Volunteers. The exhibit is admission free and open to the public during UHM Hamilton Library building hours during the Spring 2011 semester.

Peace Corps Exhibit





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